Tag Archive | murrine

Annual Giving Thanks Sale!

Hello everyone!

It’s been a while. We hope you are enjoying your holiday season where ever you are. Greg and I are having a relaxing Thanksgiving filling up on Turkey and Carrot Cake.

But we are also running our annual Giving Thanks Sale!

25% off everything in the murrine and bead Etsy stores and on the murrine on the website. Prices are already marked. Sales runs 11/22 (Thanksgiving) through Sunday night the 25th ending at midnight CST. (Note: wholesale orders, custom orders, and made to order items are not available at the sale rates).

Links

Beads: www.cdlampwork.etsy.com

Murrine: www.chasedesigns.etsy.com

Website: www.chase-designs.com

A huge thank you to all of you for allowing us to be full time artists. Have a wonderful, safe, and loving holiday.

 

Deanna & Greg

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Whole Bead Show-Amherst, MA Sept 28th-30th

Hey Y’all in the northeast. Chase Designs (that’s me!) has a table at The Whole Bead Show in Amherst, Ma at the end of September. I’ll be selling beads, marbles, and some collector murrine slices. If you’re in the area please come on by. The show coordinators were nice enough to send me five VIP passes for two people each. Admission is normally $7.00. If you want one, drop me a note with your address Deanna @ chase-designs.com, and I’ll mail them to you. First come first serve. Hope to see you there!

ISGB Gathering~ Bellevue, WA

Hello, my dear blog followers. My apologies for my neglect. This year has been amazing and wonderful, though very busy. Demons of Bourbon Street is coming along nicely and headed to the editor soon. I know you’re waiting. It’s coming. I promise. 😀

In the mean time, this weekend I am headed to Bellevue, Washington for the annual ISGB Gathering for glass bead makers. I’ll be hanging out in the vendor area selling murrine Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The great news is the vendor area is open to the public. So even if you aren’t registered for the conference, you can shop for glass supplies all four days. The bead bazaar is held on Saturday and is also open to the public.

Want to see what sort of beads Jade makes? Come on down. There will be a room full of awesome, ubber talented glass bead makers all in one place. It’s by far the best venue for seeing the top lampwork bead artists every year. Hope you can make it.

The venue is the Hyatt Regency, Bellevue, Wa.

Bead and Murrine Sale!

Hey Everyone!

A number of you have asked for it, and I honestly didn’t know when we were going to run our next sale. It seems appropriate now that the dreaded tax day is upon us that we should have a tax relief sale.

So to help you out (and us too) here it is:

20% off all beads in the Etsy store. www.cdlampwork.etsy.com

35% off all murrine in the Etsy store www.chasedesigns.etsy.com and on the website www.chase-designs.com

Prices are already marked on all three sites. Sale ends Friday 13th at midnight CST.

Happy Shopping!

Deanna and Greg

Discounts, Wholesale, and Let’s Make a Deal~The Business of Lampworking

Once you start selling your lampwork, you will run into the discount question eventually. It can come in many forms: Do you offer quantity discounts? Wholesale discounts (If you do shows, make sure you have this answer handy. You’ll need it)?  I’ve spent a lot over the course of the year, do you ever offer discounts? I’ve seen this item in your store for a while now. Would you consider selling it at X price? If I buy ten of these will you give me a discount?

Let me just say right now, I have no problem with people asking for a discount. I don’t get offended, hurt, or indignant. Many times I have seen artists get riled up when someone sends them a message offering less than the asking price or asking for a discount. But honestly, who doesn’t like a deal? And keep in mind when you sell online, the market is worldwide. That’s right worldwide.

Many cultures thrive on haggling and the “let’s make a deal” method of buying goods. It’s a normal every day thing for them. Other folks are just trying to find the best deal. No harm in that.

Some of the arguments I’ve heard from my colleagues include: But we’re selling art! It’s a piece of ourselves! How dare someone ask me to sell it for less? If I wanted to sell it for $10, I would have put a $10 price tag on it!

We Americans can be so touchy. *grin*

Once you start selling your lampwork, you’re in business. Period. Expect to get questions about discounts. It comes with the territory. Try to take emotion out of it and think with your business hat. (Yes, I know, we artists hate the business end).

Okay, so how do you handle it? Do you have a discount or wholesale policy? If not, make one and stick to it. Do not deviate from customer to customer unless you have meticulous record keeping skills.

Example: early on in my lampworking business days,  I had a regular customer who bought at least once a month. I valued her tremendously and one day she asked for a discount. I said sure. I’m pretty sure I said something like, you’ve ordered so much, each time you order from now on I’ll give you 20% off. That was all fine and dandy, until she stopped ordering as frequently. She was a designer and designers move on to new things and new designs. That’s okay.

But as you might guess, I got busy with other customers and pretty much forgot all about the 20% discount. Then the customer came back to me months (maybe even a year) later and ordered stuff, and of course by then I’d forgotten all about the discount. When she reminded me, I gave her the discount, but yeah, I admit I was a little resentful I had to give a 20% discount on a small order (less than $30). And it was my own fault. I didn’t set terms. I didn’t really have a policy. I was making it up as I went along.

So I made one. A set policy I can refer back to when I get the discount questions:

Designers: 30% off a set amount.

Bead Stores: 50% off a set amount.

And that is it. The amounts vary depending on if we’re talking about beads, marbles ,or murrine. But they are always the same. So when someone asks about discounts, I have a pat answer. There isn’t emotion involved.

Do you offer wholesale pricing?

Yes, my terms are…

Do you ever offer discounts?

Yes, my terms are…

I also run a few sales throughout the year, usually up to 25% off. To be notified of future sales, sign up for my newsletter here.

I’ve spent a lot of money with you over the course of the year. Do you offer discounts?

This one gets a little trickier, because they might be thinking they’ve already spent a lot, they deserve the discount on a small order. I always answer that an order has to meet xxx to reach wholesale levels. Sales are not accumulative. I also again refer them to the newsletter for future sales.

If I buy ten of these will you offer a discount?

See designer wholesale terms.

I’ve seen this in your store, will you sell it for X amount?

This one I am flexible on. It really depends on the item. Have I had it forever and do I want it gone? Am I just in a good mood? Or do I love the piece and am not willing to discount it? Sometimes I’ll deal, and sometimes I won’t. Just be firm (but friendly) and if you do deal, be prepared for them to try it again. That doesn’t mean you have to deal again, it just means don’t be surprised when they ask again. Trust me, they will.

As I said earlier if you do go with different discounts for different customers be sure to keep good records. I guarantee after enough time goes by, you’ll forget. We have different ones for designers, beads stores, galleries, and suppliers (for murrine).  On my website I have a place for customers to sign up for wholesale. I keep all the discounts in there for easy reference. All I have to do is look up their name and there it is. (Their wholesale terms are only visible to me on the back end of the website.)

If you don’t offer discounts of any kind, that’s fine too. My response to all of the questions above would be: Sorry, I don’t discount my work. Thank you for stopping by.

Short, to the point and respectful. Remember, you’re in business now.

Online Sales and Galleries~The Business of Lampworking

The International Society of Glass Beadmakers (ISGB) hosts a booth at The Buyers Market of American Craft (BMAC) every year in February. BMAC is the show gallery owners shop at to fill their stores. Members of the ISGB have the opportunity to participate in the show at a reduced rate. It’s a great opportunity for artists to get a feel for the show without a huge financial risk.

But how does an artist balance online sales with gallery sales? Many people will say galleries will not deal with artists who sell online. My question is as a modern artist: How can you not sell online and expect to be successful? The trick is to respect your wholesale accounts.

By this I mean: Do not undercut galleries by selling to the general public below your retail price. Your retail price is usually double your wholesale price. That means you should not list a piece on Etsy for one-hundred-dollars and expect to sell the same piece to a gallery for one-hundred-dollars as well. The gallery must mark your products up to earn a profit. If they can’t, why would they buy from you? And why would anybody buy a piece from a gallery for two-hundred-dollars when they can order it direct from the artist for half the price? Or worse, the person buys from the gallery, goes home and Googles the artist’s name and finds out they’ve overpaid. That gallery just lost a customer. Bad business.

So if you want to sell to galleries and maintain a working relationship, respect them and their need to turn a profit.

Also consider making pieces specifically targeted for galleries. These are pieces you do not offer online and are exclusive for wholesale accounts. That way there isn’t any danger of undercutting and the gallery can then charge whatever they want for the piece. The rule of thumb is wholesale is fifty percent of your retail price, but galleries sometimes mark things up two to two and a half times. If you’re selling it at double your wholesale, you are still undercutting them and they may choose not to do business with you.

I’ve already mentioned the BMAC show which is one way of introducing your work to galleries. Another is Wholesalecrafts.com. They are an online gallery exclusive to wholesale venders. Consider putting together a brochure and mailing it to the galleries you are interested in.

For local galleries call to set up appointments to meet with the gallery owners/buyers. Do not just show up with your work in your hands. Often the buyer won’t be in, plus you need to respect their time. Also they could feel put on the spot and that isn’t a great way to start a business relationship.

Be prepared. Know your wholesale terms. What dollar amount does the gallery have to meet in order to qualify for wholesale? Do they have to meet it again each time the order, or can they reorder less at wholesale rates after the relationship is established? Will you accept net-thirty payment terms? Does the gallery have to pay upfront? Are you willing to offer pieces on consignment? If so, have a boiler plate contract ready to go. Does the gallery pay you if items get lost, stolen or broken? What is the consignment rate? fifty-fifty? Sixty-forty?

The more professional you are, the more likely they are to take you seriously. We artists can be flaky. You don’t want to give them a reason to say no.

With all this said, I confess, Greg and I don’t sell much work through galleries. We have done some in the past and may in the future. But currently, I just have too much on my plate with online sales, shows, wholesale bead and murrine accounts, and the books I”m writing. Adding wholesale gallery accounts and doing it right is just one too many things right now. It’s important to know your limits.

Good luck!

Radio Silence Has Ended

It’s been over a week since I posted. Most of that is because I was out of town last weekend at Hottime on the Mountain in Asheville, NC. I was fortunate enough to be asked to demo one of my murrine ring beads.

I made one like this but added butterflies. It went pretty well, despite using a smaller torch than I am used to (which is pretty much always the case in these settings and is totally fine). It just means the poor attendees had to spend a lot of time watching me wait for glass to melt.

However, on Sunday morning many of them showed me their class beads and everyone did super awesome. I know what it feels like to be scared of using murrine. Greg (the hubby) is a master and it still took me years to get comfortable with trying. It’s really not that hard, I promise.

Anyway, I came home with a pretty nasty head and chest cold. This is what happens when one doesn’t have kids and rarely spends a bunch of time with the general public. Our immune systems just aren’t up to fight off the latest germ de jour. Hopefully I don’t infect Greg. Two of us sick just won’t do. Especially since I’m feeling pretty pathetic right now.

One bright spot in my day however is a five heart review I just found on Sizzling Hot Book Reviews of Haunted on Bourbon Street. It’s the first book blogger review I’m aware of and I couldn’t be more thrilled.

Haunted on Bourbon Street is a wonderful debut novel for Deanna K Chase with a well developed plot, strong characters and a multi-faceted story line with twists and turns to keep you thinking.Haunted on Bourbon Street  is sultry and sexy with just enough tension to want the reader to scream, yet enough details to leave the reader satisfied that they aren’t guessing what’s going on. I have to say, pick up Haunted on Bourbon Street and just enjoy it for the paranormal mystery romance that it is.”

Yay for a pick me up!